07/25/16

Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph

The Official Ubuntu Book, 9th Edition released!

Back in 2014 I had the opportunity to lend my expertise to the 8th edition of The Official Ubuntu Book and began my path into authorship. Since then, I’ve completed the first edition of Common OpenStack Deployments, coming out in September. I was thrilled this year when Matthew Helmke invited me back to work on the 9th edition of The Official Ubuntu Book. We also had José Antonio Rey joining us for this edition as a third co-author.

One of the things we focused on with the 8th edition was, knowing that it would have a shelf life of 2 years, future-proofing. With the 9th edition we continued this focus, but also wanted to add a whole new chapter: Ubuntu, Convergence, and Devices of the Future

Taking a snippet from the book’s sample content, the chapter gives a whirlwind tour of where Ubuntu on desktops, servers and devices is going:

Chapter 10: Ubuntu, Convergence, and Devices of the Future 261

The Convergence Vision 262
Unity 263
Ubuntu Devices 264
The Internet of Things and Beyond 268
The Future of the Ubuntu Desktop 272
Summary 273

The biggest challenge with this chapter was the future-proofing. We’re in an exciting point in the world of Ubuntu and how it’s moved far beyond “Linux for Human Beings” on the desktop and into powering servers, tablets, robots and even refrigerators. With the Snappy and Ubuntu Core technologies both powering much of this progress and changing rapidly, we had to be cautious about how in depth we covered this tooling. With the help of Michael Hall, Nathan Haines and Sergio Schvezov I believe we’ve succeeded in presenting a chapter that gives the reader a firm overview of these new technologies, while being general enough to last us until the 10th edition of this book.

Also thanks to Thomas Mashos of the Mythbuntu team and Paul Mellors who also pitched in with this edition. Finally, as with the last edition, it was a pleasure to work with Matthew and José on this book. I hope you enjoy it!

25 July 2016 20:27:34

07/22/16

Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph

Ubuntu 16.04 in the SF Bay Area

Back in June I gave a presentation on the 16.04 release down at FeltonLUG, which I wrote about here.

Making my way closer to home, I continued my tour of Ubuntu 16.04 talks in the San Francisco Bay Area. A couple weeks ago I gave the talk at SVLUG (Silicon Valley Linux Users Group) and on Tuesday I spoke at BALUG (Bay Area Linux Users Group).

I hadn’t been down to an SVLUG meeting in a couple years, so I appreciated the invitation. They have a great space set up for presentations, and the crowd was very friendly. I particularly enjoyed that folks came with a lot of questions, which meant we had an engaging evening and it stretched what is alone a pretty short talk into one that filled the whole presentation time. Slides: svlug_ubuntu_1604.pdf (6.0M), svlug_ubuntu_1604.odp (5.4M)


Presentation, tablets and giveaways at SVLUG

At BALUG this week things were considerably more casual. The venue is a projector-less Chinese restaurant these days and the meetings tend to be on the small side. After family style dinner, attendees gathered around my big laptop running Ubuntu as I walked through my slide deck. It worked better than expected, and the format definitely lent itself to people asking questions and having discussions throughout too. Very similar slides to the ones I had at SVLUG: balug_ubuntu_1604.pdf (6.0M), balug_ubuntu_1604.odp (5.4M)


Setup and giveaways at BALUG

Next week my Ubuntu 16.04 talk adventures culminate in the event I’m most excited about, the San Francisco Ubuntu 16.04 release party at OpenDNS office located at 135 Bluxome St in San Francisco!

The event is on Thursday, July 28th from 6:30 – 8:30PM.

It’s right near the Caltrain station, so where ever you are in the bay it should be easy to get to.

  • Laptops running Ubuntu and Xubuntu 16.04.
  • Tablets running the latest Ubuntu build, including the bq Aquaris M10 that shipped with Ubuntu and demonstrates convergence.
  • Giveaways, including the 9th edition of the Official Ubuntu book (new release!), pens, stickers and more.

I’ll need to plan for food, so I need folks to RSVP. There are a few options for RSVP:

Need more convincing? It’ll be fun! And I’m a volunteer whose systems engineering job is unrelated to the Ubuntu project. In order to continue putting the work into hosting these events, I need the satisfaction of having people come.

Finally, event packs from Canonical are now being shipped out to LoCos! It’s noteworthy that for this release instead of shipping DVDs, which have been in sharp popularity decline over the past couple of years, they are now shipping USB sticks. These are really nice, but the distribution is limited to just 25 USB sticks in the shipment for the team. This is an order of magnitude fewer than we got with DVDs, but they’re also much more expensive.


Event pack from Canonical

Not in the San Francisco Bay Area? If you feel inspired to give an Ubuntu 16.04 presentation, you’re welcome to use my slides, and I’d love to see pictures from your event!

22 July 2016 00:17:12

07/21/16

Svetlana Belkin

On The State Of Health Of Our LoCos

Over the last year, Miles Sharpe (Kilos on IRC) worked hard on getting the African LoCos united and active again.  Now he is working with two other LoCo’s: ubuntu-bd and ubuntu-pk.

The problem that he found in the ubuntu-bd LoCo is this:

I started with ubuntu-bd and found 3 nicks on the irc channel and no one
responding. There were over 20 applicants waiting for approval on LP. some for 2 years already. So with some help from the LC we found the owner and he came and agreed to get things going again but said those users prefer facebook and later said he was to busy. And their mailing list is for announcements. I am not a fan of mailing lists but find that they are a good way of getting a message out when one has no irc contact with someone. At least the LP applicants are approved now.  He greeted a few times after that and has now withdrawn again, so pavlushka (the failed applicant) has been trying to get things going again.
At times there are 10 nicks in channel and from chatting to them for the last 5 months, I have learned that they aren’t satisfied with the way things are going there.The Ubuntu community spirit is missing.

Taken from here.

And for the ubuntu-pk LoCo:

I then started looking at the ubuntu-pk channel and found it in the same sad state of affairs. After a couple of months an old ubuntu user from pk arrived and was surprised to find any life there and he has been helping regrow the channel. And will apply for Ubuntu membership within a few months. By rights he could have done that years ago imo. But once again the leadership is at fault. Here is his old wiki page
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/shani

Taken from here.

Both of this examples points to one problem: these LoCos are using Facebook instead of IRC/Mailing-Lists.  Two reasons come up to my mind on why: 1)we are in a new age where social media dominates and 2)these are third-world countries and Internet is expensive.  Because of that, the providers give “free” Internet where the users can only access Facebook and Twitter for free.  In turn, these people of these countries don’t have a sense of what the Internet is really is.  This is where Mozilla Learning aims to educate these people.  But we are not Mozilla, we are Ubuntu and this is not our problem.  Our problem is the health of our Community (looking at Memberships mainly), mainly the LoCos.

One solution is like the Ubuntu Forums system for Membership.  But the problem is how to deal with the applications on Facebook and other social media sites.  One solution is using groups, but that still requires the applicants to have a wiki page, sign the CoC, and the other items for Membership.  And who will oversee the process on these social media sites?

Other LoCos are inactive via the Ubuntu Community or even social media.  The Oceania LoCos are examples. I lied, they are using G+, I need a better example.  The problem with these LoCos is how would new comers be able to join and then find out that there is no one to greet them?  Or even help on rebooting the LoCo?  The solution is come and join #ubuntu-locoteams on irc.feenode.net, where we can help you connect with others of your LoCo or to give ideas on how to reboot your LoCo.

The last group of LoCos are LoCos who have members but they are scattered throughout the country/state.  My LoCo, Ubuntu Ohio, is one example.  One solution to the problem is figure out a common meeting spot and date and meet there.

The bottom line here is that we need to rethink our health of our LoCos as they are source of our Ubuntu Members and it’s a way to connect with others in real life.

EDIT TO ADD: Uniting LoCos in the same continent or country (USA for example) is another solution.

21 July 2016 16:30:39